Scientists from the Nencki Institute co-author a paper published in the Science* magazine explaining one of the secrets of cancer formation.

Print
1 2 3

The paper appeared in the Science Express category, which is the editors-in-chief’s selection of the best works published in the Science magazine.

The paper entitled “PML regulates apoptosis at endoplasmic reticulum by modulating calcium release” is a result of cooperation between scientists from Poland, Italy and the United States. Its Polish authors are Prof. Jerzy Duszyński, Dr. Hab. Mariusz Więckowski and PhD candidate Magda Lebiedzińska from the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences.

Researchers have demonstrated that disturbances in communication between intracellular structures can lead to formation of cancer lesions. Their truly innovative discovery is that one of the important links of this communication is the PML protein (promyelocytic leukaemia protein), a suppressor of promyelocytic leukaemia – a malignant tumour of the blood and bone marrow.

As has been known already for years, genetic damage of the PML protein is at the base of many neoplastic diseases. The cell’s genetic material is vulnerable to damage resulting from exposure to various environmental factors, such as harmful chemical compounds or ionizing radiation. Normal PML protein, located in the cell’s nucleus is needed to identify this damage. Therefore, when PML abnormal variant is formed, DNA damage could accumulate in the cells and in consequence lead to development of tumour lesions.

However the PML protein is located not only in the cell’s nucleus, but also in other cellular compartments. To date the role of the extranuclear PML protein was poorly understood. The paper published in the latest issue of the Science magazine, delivered in cooperation with scientists from Harvard University and University of Ferrara, explains this issue in depth.

The study, described in the paper, employed the newest techniques of molecular biology and cutting age laboratory equipment to show that the PML protein is an important participant in the process of the programmed cell death (apoptosis) and explain the mechanism of its involvement in this process.

Apoptosis is a phenomenon whereby millions of cells in our organism are undergoing self-destruction every minute. For example many “unwanted” cells in the blood are continuously being replaced with new cells. Should these „unwanted” cells disintegrate in an uncontrolled way, we would have to deal with permanent and acute inflammation. In the process of apoptosis, on the other hand, cells disintegrate into tiny vesicles, which are absorbed by specialized cells. There is no inflammation and in addition many components of the unwanted cells are „recycled” within the organism.

Body cells with damaged genetic material or cells infected with a virus also die the apoptic death. Cancer cells, however, are quite resistant to apoptosis. It is actually believed that disturbed apoptosis could lead to formation and development of cancer. If we were able to overcome the resistance of cancer cells to enter apoptosis, we could significantly limit the development of neoplastic disease.

In their work published in Science, the Polish-Italian-American research team demonstrated that within the cell the PML protein is located also in the contact zone of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum where signal transduction using calcium ions takes place. Scientists have demonstrated that the correct from of PML is needed to generate this signal (other proteins participating in this communication have also been identified). Mitochondria activated with the calcium signal initiate the process of apoptosis in the cell.

This provides an accurate and full explanation of the mechanism of PML protein’s essential involvement in the proper execution of the process of apoptosis. Scientists have shown why cells with abnormal PML protein not only accumulate damage to the genetic material but also are resistant to the programmed cell death.

Results of this work indicate that the PML protein could constitute a target of a new anti-tumour therapy.

Based on a Polish Press Agency release of November 23, 2010.

*Giorgi C, Ito K, Lin HK, Santangelo C, Wieckowski MR, Lebiedzinska M, Bononi A, Bonora M, Duszynski J, Bernardi R, Rizzuto R, Tacchetti C, Pinton P, Pandolfi PP. (2010) PML Regulates Apoptosis at Endoplasmic Reticulum Modulating Calcium Release. Science 330: 1247-51.


Scientists from the Nencki Institute co-author a paper published in the Science* magazine explaining one of the secrets of cancer formation.

Print
1 2 3

The paper appeared in the Science Express category, which is the editors-in-chief’s selection of the best works published in the Science magazine.

The paper entitled “PML regulates apoptosis at endoplasmic reticulum by modulating calcium release” is a result of cooperation between scientists from Poland, Italy and the United States. Its Polish authors are Prof. Jerzy Duszyński, Dr. Hab. Mariusz Więckowski and PhD candidate Magda Lebiedzińska from the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences.

Researchers have demonstrated that disturbances in communication between intracellular structures can lead to formation of cancer lesions. Their truly innovative discovery is that one of the important links of this communication is the PML protein (promyelocytic leukaemia protein), a suppressor of promyelocytic leukaemia – a malignant tumour of the blood and bone marrow.

As has been known already for years, genetic damage of the PML protein is at the base of many neoplastic diseases. The cell’s genetic material is vulnerable to damage resulting from exposure to various environmental factors, such as harmful chemical compounds or ionizing radiation. Normal PML protein, located in the cell’s nucleus is needed to identify this damage. Therefore, when PML abnormal variant is formed, DNA damage could accumulate in the cells and in consequence lead to development of tumour lesions.

However the PML protein is located not only in the cell’s nucleus, but also in other cellular compartments. To date the role of the extranuclear PML protein was poorly understood. The paper published in the latest issue of the Science magazine, delivered in cooperation with scientists from Harvard University and University of Ferrara, explains this issue in depth.

The study, described in the paper, employed the newest techniques of molecular biology and cutting age laboratory equipment to show that the PML protein is an important participant in the process of the programmed cell death (apoptosis) and explain the mechanism of its involvement in this process.

Apoptosis is a phenomenon whereby millions of cells in our organism are undergoing self-destruction every minute. For example many “unwanted” cells in the blood are continuously being replaced with new cells. Should these „unwanted” cells disintegrate in an uncontrolled way, we would have to deal with permanent and acute inflammation. In the process of apoptosis, on the other hand, cells disintegrate into tiny vesicles, which are absorbed by specialized cells. There is no inflammation and in addition many components of the unwanted cells are „recycled” within the organism.

Body cells with damaged genetic material or cells infected with a virus also die the apoptic death. Cancer cells, however, are quite resistant to apoptosis. It is actually believed that disturbed apoptosis could lead to formation and development of cancer. If we were able to overcome the resistance of cancer cells to enter apoptosis, we could significantly limit the development of neoplastic disease.

In their work published in Science, the Polish-Italian-American research team demonstrated that within the cell the PML protein is located also in the contact zone of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum where signal transduction using calcium ions takes place. Scientists have demonstrated that the correct from of PML is needed to generate this signal (other proteins participating in this communication have also been identified). Mitochondria activated with the calcium signal initiate the process of apoptosis in the cell.

This provides an accurate and full explanation of the mechanism of PML protein’s essential involvement in the proper execution of the process of apoptosis. Scientists have shown why cells with abnormal PML protein not only accumulate damage to the genetic material but also are resistant to the programmed cell death.

Results of this work indicate that the PML protein could constitute a target of a new anti-tumour therapy.

Based on a Polish Press Agency release of November 23, 2010.

*Giorgi C, Ito K, Lin HK, Santangelo C, Wieckowski MR, Lebiedzinska M, Bononi A, Bonora M, Duszynski J, Bernardi R, Rizzuto R, Tacchetti C, Pinton P, Pandolfi PP. (2010) PML Regulates Apoptosis at Endoplasmic Reticulum Modulating Calcium Release. Science 330: 1247-51.


Scientists from the Nencki Institute co-author a paper published in the Science* magazine explaining one of the secrets of cancer formation.

Print
1 2 3

The paper appeared in the Science Express category, which is the editors-in-chief’s selection of the best works published in the Science magazine.

The paper entitled “PML regulates apoptosis at endoplasmic reticulum by modulating calcium release” is a result of cooperation between scientists from Poland, Italy and the United States. Its Polish authors are Prof. Jerzy Duszyński, Dr. Hab. Mariusz Więckowski and PhD candidate Magda Lebiedzińska from the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences.

Researchers have demonstrated that disturbances in communication between intracellular structures can lead to formation of cancer lesions. Their truly innovative discovery is that one of the important links of this communication is the PML protein (promyelocytic leukaemia protein), a suppressor of promyelocytic leukaemia – a malignant tumour of the blood and bone marrow.

As has been known already for years, genetic damage of the PML protein is at the base of many neoplastic diseases. The cell’s genetic material is vulnerable to damage resulting from exposure to various environmental factors, such as harmful chemical compounds or ionizing radiation. Normal PML protein, located in the cell’s nucleus is needed to identify this damage. Therefore, when PML abnormal variant is formed, DNA damage could accumulate in the cells and in consequence lead to development of tumour lesions.

However the PML protein is located not only in the cell’s nucleus, but also in other cellular compartments. To date the role of the extranuclear PML protein was poorly understood. The paper published in the latest issue of the Science magazine, delivered in cooperation with scientists from Harvard University and University of Ferrara, explains this issue in depth.

The study, described in the paper, employed the newest techniques of molecular biology and cutting age laboratory equipment to show that the PML protein is an important participant in the process of the programmed cell death (apoptosis) and explain the mechanism of its involvement in this process.

Apoptosis is a phenomenon whereby millions of cells in our organism are undergoing self-destruction every minute. For example many “unwanted” cells in the blood are continuously being replaced with new cells. Should these „unwanted” cells disintegrate in an uncontrolled way, we would have to deal with permanent and acute inflammation. In the process of apoptosis, on the other hand, cells disintegrate into tiny vesicles, which are absorbed by specialized cells. There is no inflammation and in addition many components of the unwanted cells are „recycled” within the organism.

Body cells with damaged genetic material or cells infected with a virus also die the apoptic death. Cancer cells, however, are quite resistant to apoptosis. It is actually believed that disturbed apoptosis could lead to formation and development of cancer. If we were able to overcome the resistance of cancer cells to enter apoptosis, we could significantly limit the development of neoplastic disease.

In their work published in Science, the Polish-Italian-American research team demonstrated that within the cell the PML protein is located also in the contact zone of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum where signal transduction using calcium ions takes place. Scientists have demonstrated that the correct from of PML is needed to generate this signal (other proteins participating in this communication have also been identified). Mitochondria activated with the calcium signal initiate the process of apoptosis in the cell.

This provides an accurate and full explanation of the mechanism of PML protein’s essential involvement in the proper execution of the process of apoptosis. Scientists have shown why cells with abnormal PML protein not only accumulate damage to the genetic material but also are resistant to the programmed cell death.

Results of this work indicate that the PML protein could constitute a target of a new anti-tumour therapy.

Based on a Polish Press Agency release of November 23, 2010.

*Giorgi C, Ito K, Lin HK, Santangelo C, Wieckowski MR, Lebiedzinska M, Bononi A, Bonora M, Duszynski J, Bernardi R, Rizzuto R, Tacchetti C, Pinton P, Pandolfi PP. (2010) PML Regulates Apoptosis at Endoplasmic Reticulum Modulating Calcium Release. Science 330: 1247-51.


Scientists from the Nencki Institute co-author a paper published in the Science* magazine explaining one of the secrets of cancer formation.

Print
1 2 3

The paper appeared in the Science Express category, which is the editors-in-chief’s selection of the best works published in the Science magazine.

The paper entitled “PML regulates apoptosis at endoplasmic reticulum by modulating calcium release” is a result of cooperation between scientists from Poland, Italy and the United States. Its Polish authors are Prof. Jerzy Duszyński, Dr. Hab. Mariusz Więckowski and PhD candidate Magda Lebiedzińska from the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences.

Researchers have demonstrated that disturbances in communication between intracellular structures can lead to formation of cancer lesions. Their truly innovative discovery is that one of the important links of this communication is the PML protein (promyelocytic leukaemia protein), a suppressor of promyelocytic leukaemia – a malignant tumour of the blood and bone marrow.

As has been known already for years, genetic damage of the PML protein is at the base of many neoplastic diseases. The cell’s genetic material is vulnerable to damage resulting from exposure to various environmental factors, such as harmful chemical compounds or ionizing radiation. Normal PML protein, located in the cell’s nucleus is needed to identify this damage. Therefore, when PML abnormal variant is formed, DNA damage could accumulate in the cells and in consequence lead to development of tumour lesions.

However the PML protein is located not only in the cell’s nucleus, but also in other cellular compartments. To date the role of the extranuclear PML protein was poorly understood. The paper published in the latest issue of the Science magazine, delivered in cooperation with scientists from Harvard University and University of Ferrara, explains this issue in depth.

The study, described in the paper, employed the newest techniques of molecular biology and cutting age laboratory equipment to show that the PML protein is an important participant in the process of the programmed cell death (apoptosis) and explain the mechanism of its involvement in this process.

Apoptosis is a phenomenon whereby millions of cells in our organism are undergoing self-destruction every minute. For example many “unwanted” cells in the blood are continuously being replaced with new cells. Should these „unwanted” cells disintegrate in an uncontrolled way, we would have to deal with permanent and acute inflammation. In the process of apoptosis, on the other hand, cells disintegrate into tiny vesicles, which are absorbed by specialized cells. There is no inflammation and in addition many components of the unwanted cells are „recycled” within the organism.

Body cells with damaged genetic material or cells infected with a virus also die the apoptic death. Cancer cells, however, are quite resistant to apoptosis. It is actually believed that disturbed apoptosis could lead to formation and development of cancer. If we were able to overcome the resistance of cancer cells to enter apoptosis, we could significantly limit the development of neoplastic disease.

In their work published in Science, the Polish-Italian-American research team demonstrated that within the cell the PML protein is located also in the contact zone of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum where signal transduction using calcium ions takes place. Scientists have demonstrated that the correct from of PML is needed to generate this signal (other proteins participating in this communication have also been identified). Mitochondria activated with the calcium signal initiate the process of apoptosis in the cell.

This provides an accurate and full explanation of the mechanism of PML protein’s essential involvement in the proper execution of the process of apoptosis. Scientists have shown why cells with abnormal PML protein not only accumulate damage to the genetic material but also are resistant to the programmed cell death.

Results of this work indicate that the PML protein could constitute a target of a new anti-tumour therapy.

Based on a Polish Press Agency release of November 23, 2010.

*Giorgi C, Ito K, Lin HK, Santangelo C, Wieckowski MR, Lebiedzinska M, Bononi A, Bonora M, Duszynski J, Bernardi R, Rizzuto R, Tacchetti C, Pinton P, Pandolfi PP. (2010) PML Regulates Apoptosis at Endoplasmic Reticulum Modulating Calcium Release. Science 330: 1247-51.


Scientists from the Nencki Institute co-author a paper published in the Science* magazine explaining one of the secrets of cancer formation.

Print
1 2 3

The paper appeared in the Science Express category, which is the editors-in-chief’s selection of the best works published in the Science magazine.

The paper entitled “PML regulates apoptosis at endoplasmic reticulum by modulating calcium release” is a result of cooperation between scientists from Poland, Italy and the United States. Its Polish authors are Prof. Jerzy Duszyński, Dr. Hab. Mariusz Więckowski and PhD candidate Magda Lebiedzińska from the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences.

Researchers have demonstrated that disturbances in communication between intracellular structures can lead to formation of cancer lesions. Their truly innovative discovery is that one of the important links of this communication is the PML protein (promyelocytic leukaemia protein), a suppressor of promyelocytic leukaemia – a malignant tumour of the blood and bone marrow.

As has been known already for years, genetic damage of the PML protein is at the base of many neoplastic diseases. The cell’s genetic material is vulnerable to damage resulting from exposure to various environmental factors, such as harmful chemical compounds or ionizing radiation. Normal PML protein, located in the cell’s nucleus is needed to identify this damage. Therefore, when PML abnormal variant is formed, DNA damage could accumulate in the cells and in consequence lead to development of tumour lesions.

However the PML protein is located not only in the cell’s nucleus, but also in other cellular compartments. To date the role of the extranuclear PML protein was poorly understood. The paper published in the latest issue of the Science magazine, delivered in cooperation with scientists from Harvard University and University of Ferrara, explains this issue in depth.

The study, described in the paper, employed the newest techniques of molecular biology and cutting age laboratory equipment to show that the PML protein is an important participant in the process of the programmed cell death (apoptosis) and explain the mechanism of its involvement in this process.

Apoptosis is a phenomenon whereby millions of cells in our organism are undergoing self-destruction every minute. For example many “unwanted” cells in the blood are continuously being replaced with new cells. Should these „unwanted” cells disintegrate in an uncontrolled way, we would have to deal with permanent and acute inflammation. In the process of apoptosis, on the other hand, cells disintegrate into tiny vesicles, which are absorbed by specialized cells. There is no inflammation and in addition many components of the unwanted cells are „recycled” within the organism.

Body cells with damaged genetic material or cells infected with a virus also die the apoptic death. Cancer cells, however, are quite resistant to apoptosis. It is actually believed that disturbed apoptosis could lead to formation and development of cancer. If we were able to overcome the resistance of cancer cells to enter apoptosis, we could significantly limit the development of neoplastic disease.

In their work published in Science, the Polish-Italian-American research team demonstrated that within the cell the PML protein is located also in the contact zone of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum where signal transduction using calcium ions takes place. Scientists have demonstrated that the correct from of PML is needed to generate this signal (other proteins participating in this communication have also been identified). Mitochondria activated with the calcium signal initiate the process of apoptosis in the cell.

This provides an accurate and full explanation of the mechanism of PML protein’s essential involvement in the proper execution of the process of apoptosis. Scientists have shown why cells with abnormal PML protein not only accumulate damage to the genetic material but also are resistant to the programmed cell death.

Results of this work indicate that the PML protein could constitute a target of a new anti-tumour therapy.

Based on a Polish Press Agency release of November 23, 2010.

*Giorgi C, Ito K, Lin HK, Santangelo C, Wieckowski MR, Lebiedzinska M, Bononi A, Bonora M, Duszynski J, Bernardi R, Rizzuto R, Tacchetti C, Pinton P, Pandolfi PP. (2010) PML Regulates Apoptosis at Endoplasmic Reticulum Modulating Calcium Release. Science 330: 1247-51.


Scientists from the Nencki Institute co-author a paper published in the Science* magazine explaining one of the secrets of cancer formation.

Print
1 2 3

The paper appeared in the Science Express category, which is the editors-in-chief’s selection of the best works published in the Science magazine.

The paper entitled “PML regulates apoptosis at endoplasmic reticulum by modulating calcium release” is a result of cooperation between scientists from Poland, Italy and the United States. Its Polish authors are Prof. Jerzy Duszyński, Dr. Hab. Mariusz Więckowski and PhD candidate Magda Lebiedzińska from the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences.

Researchers have demonstrated that disturbances in communication between intracellular structures can lead to formation of cancer lesions. Their truly innovative discovery is that one of the important links of this communication is the PML protein (promyelocytic leukaemia protein), a suppressor of promyelocytic leukaemia – a malignant tumour of the blood and bone marrow.

As has been known already for years, genetic damage of the PML protein is at the base of many neoplastic diseases. The cell’s genetic material is vulnerable to damage resulting from exposure to various environmental factors, such as harmful chemical compounds or ionizing radiation. Normal PML protein, located in the cell’s nucleus is needed to identify this damage. Therefore, when PML abnormal variant is formed, DNA damage could accumulate in the cells and in consequence lead to development of tumour lesions.

However the PML protein is located not only in the cell’s nucleus, but also in other cellular compartments. To date the role of the extranuclear PML protein was poorly understood. The paper published in the latest issue of the Science magazine, delivered in cooperation with scientists from Harvard University and University of Ferrara, explains this issue in depth.

The study, described in the paper, employed the newest techniques of molecular biology and cutting age laboratory equipment to show that the PML protein is an important participant in the process of the programmed cell death (apoptosis) and explain the mechanism of its involvement in this process.

Apoptosis is a phenomenon whereby millions of cells in our organism are undergoing self-destruction every minute. For example many “unwanted” cells in the blood are continuously being replaced with new cells. Should these „unwanted” cells disintegrate in an uncontrolled way, we would have to deal with permanent and acute inflammation. In the process of apoptosis, on the other hand, cells disintegrate into tiny vesicles, which are absorbed by specialized cells. There is no inflammation and in addition many components of the unwanted cells are „recycled” within the organism.

Body cells with damaged genetic material or cells infected with a virus also die the apoptic death. Cancer cells, however, are quite resistant to apoptosis. It is actually believed that disturbed apoptosis could lead to formation and development of cancer. If we were able to overcome the resistance of cancer cells to enter apoptosis, we could significantly limit the development of neoplastic disease.

In their work published in Science, the Polish-Italian-American research team demonstrated that within the cell the PML protein is located also in the contact zone of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum where signal transduction using calcium ions takes place. Scientists have demonstrated that the correct from of PML is needed to generate this signal (other proteins participating in this communication have also been identified). Mitochondria activated with the calcium signal initiate the process of apoptosis in the cell.

This provides an accurate and full explanation of the mechanism of PML protein’s essential involvement in the proper execution of the process of apoptosis. Scientists have shown why cells with abnormal PML protein not only accumulate damage to the genetic material but also are resistant to the programmed cell death.

Results of this work indicate that the PML protein could constitute a target of a new anti-tumour therapy.

Based on a Polish Press Agency release of November 23, 2010.

*Giorgi C, Ito K, Lin HK, Santangelo C, Wieckowski MR, Lebiedzinska M, Bononi A, Bonora M, Duszynski J, Bernardi R, Rizzuto R, Tacchetti C, Pinton P, Pandolfi PP. (2010) PML Regulates Apoptosis at Endoplasmic Reticulum Modulating Calcium Release. Science 330: 1247-51.


2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

  • IV. Biogerontological Meeting at the Nencki Institute

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  • Award of the Division of Biological Sciences

    The 2009 Award for the scientific achievements for the set of papers published in 2006-2008 and dealing with the “Regulation and role of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, MMP-9 inphysiological and pathological neuronal plasticity” was granted to research team.

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  • VIII Scientific Meeting for Teacher

    On 5th of December 2009 VIII Scientific Meeting For Teacher was organized by the the Nencki Institute and the Science Festival School. In this event took part more than 60 persons from all over Poland. Meeting was covered by the Honorary Patronage of the Mazovian Chief Education Officer.

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  • Prof. Kris Turlejski, a neurobiologist from the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology who until now chaired the First Local Ethics Committee in Warsaw has been nominated by the Minister of Science for the member of the State Ethics Committee and then elected its Chair.

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  • On November 2, 2009 Prof. Adam Szewczyk signed, on behalf of the Nencki Institute, a bilateral Cooperation Agreement concerning execution of the CePT Project: Centre of Preclinical Research and Technology with the Medical University of Warsaw. The Nencki Institute along with the Medical University of Warsaw – the CePT consortium coordinator and the University of Warsaw is one of the main beneficiaries of the CePT project. The value of the Centre for Neurobiology (CN) investment has been estimated at 52 million PLN, which constitutes approx. 15% of the total value of the CePT project (359 million PLN).

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  • International PhD Studies at the Nencki Institute

    Dr Ksenia Meyza, from the group of prof. Jolanta Zagrodzka, was the winner (one of three) of The PNS Young Investigator Awards, during The 9th International Congress of the Polish Neuroscience Society, Warsaw 2009, for the lecture entitled: „Electrophysiological correlates of diverse emotional reactivity of Roman High – (RHA/Verh) and Roman Low Avoidance (RLA/Verh) rats”.

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  • XIII Warsaw Science Festival 2009

    The XIII Science Festival took place in Warsaw between September 19 and 27. Each year the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology actively participates in this event.

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  • Ms. Dorota Wypych has received II Price for the presentation entitled “Studies on local dynamics of calcium transients in glioma C6 cells”, presented during the VIIth Parnas Conference, organized by the Polish and Ukrainian Biochemical Societies, that took place in Yalta

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  • On 30th of May 2009 the 13th Scientific Picnic was held on the New Town Square and Podzamcze Areas. This year picnic’s motto was: „SCIENCE AMONG THE STARS”. Like in previous years the Nencki Institute took part in this event and prepared series of presentations under the common title: „EARTHLY BODY, SPIRIT FROM THE STARS”

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  • Hands-on course at Nencki Institute

    On 14-15 May at Nencki Institute a hands-on course “Introduction to modeling of nervous system” took place. The course was organized under the auspices of the Polish Society for Neuroscience.

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  • Polish Children’s Fund

    Again, as every year, the Fund’s scholars visited the Nencki Institute and participated in lab activities and research training.

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  • Reporting Session

    Session of the Scientific Council 7. devoted to the 2008 Annual Report took place on February 27, 2009. Besides the information given by Prof. Adam Szewczyk, Director of the Nencki Institute, there were research reports of Dr. Katarzyna Łukasiuk and Dr. Grzegorz Wilczyński, the winners of the Group Leader 2005 competition.

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2008

  • 2008 Prime Minister Awards

    We have the pleasure to inform you that two of our colleagues are among the prize-winners of the 2008 Prime Minister Awards for PhD dissertations, postdoctoral dissertations and scientific, scientific and technical, or artistic activity:
    Kamila Wolanin for her PhD dissertation entitled “The role of Bcr-Abl oncoprotein in the regulation of the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint function and polyploidization” – supervised by prof. dr hab. Ewa Sikora
    Filip Konopacki for his PhD dissertation “Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), its expression in the stimulated brain and influence on astroglia function” – supervised by prof. dr hab. Leszek Kaczmarek.

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  • Bolesław Skarżyński Award

    The Polish Biochemical Society has granted Prof. Lech Wojtczak and Dr. Krzysztof Zabłocki with Bolesław Skarżyński Award for the best article published in a quarterly journal “Postępy Biochemii” in year 2008. The article is entiled: “Mitochondria in cell life, death and disease”.

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  • On 4th December 2008 in the Mirror Room of the Staszic Palace (the Polish Academy of Sciences) prof. Adam Szewczyk, the Acting Director of the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, inaugurated the 90th Anniversary of the Institute and welcomed honorable guests and employees of the Institute.

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  • GroupLeader 2008 competition

    On 1-2 December 2008 final stage of the competition for a Head of a Laboratory at the Nencki Institute took place.

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  • Homing 2008

    It is our pleasure to announce that two of our colleagues have received a support from Foundation for Polish Science (HOMING 2008) for the reintegration of researchers and fostering cooperation with their former host institutions after their stay abroad:
    Katarzyna Kalita-Bykowska (University of Louisville, USA)
    Ewelina Knapska (University of Michigan, USA)

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  • Science Festival 2008

    Again, as every year, we took part in the XII edition of the Science Festival in 2008. Due to the building repairs at the Nencki Institute only 4 lectures were held at the International Centre of Biocybernetics. All of them were very highly appreciated by the audience members. In 2009 we will return to the previous participation formula.

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  • The Scientific Council of the Nencki Institute during its session on May 16th 2008 expressed its opinion on the government project of the reform of science and higher education in Poland. The Council decided to support the pro-reformatory resolution of the Scientific Council of The Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics in Warsaw and the petition of the International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology to actively participate in the discussion on the proposed reform.

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2007

2006

  • FEBS Course on Mitochondria 2006

    The aim of the Course was to familiarize its participants with modern techniques of studying mitochondrial metabolism and energetics. Lectures introduced the students to problems of i.e. mitochondrial energy conservation, ion transport and homeostasis"…()":http://www.nencki.gov.pl/febs2006/

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2003-2005

  • European Science Foundation Workshop 2003

    The purpose of the Workshop was to sum up recent state of our knowledge on mitochondrial functions within the cell with the numerous aspects of cell energetics, development and transformation"… → ()":http://www.nencki.gov.pl/iiclab/ESF/

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  • Report of the FEBS evaluation panel visit 2003

    The members of the evaluation panel received extensive electronic documentation describing the Institute organisation and scientific activities prior to the visit. The panel listened to the brief presentation of the departments and had constructive discussions. Finally, the panel exchanged their views concerning the day’s events.

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